Title

"But You Don't Look Puerto Rican": The Moderating Effect of Ethnic Identity on the Relation Between Skin Color and Self-Esteem Among Puerto Rican Women

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2008

Abstract

This exploratory study investigated whether ethnic identity, as assessed by Phinney's (1992) Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, functioned as a moderator in the relation between skin color (as measured by masked interviewer evaluation, participant self-report, and skin reflectance data) and self-esteem (as measured by Rosenberg's 1989 Self-Esteem Scale). In a sample of 53 English-speaking Puerto Rican women, a hierarchical multiple regression indicated that among lighter skinned women, those who felt less attached to their culture had less self-esteem than those who were more culturally embedded. Similarly, among darker skinned women, greater attachment to Puerto Rican culture was associated with greater self-esteem than a less defined ethnic identity. Findings are discussed in light of the beneficial effects of ethnic identity.

Journal

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychoogy

Volume

14

First Page

102

Last Page

108