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Stone had feared that McIlvaine would recall him with "painful feelings," and had honestly thought his theological opinions identical to Ridley, Crammer, Jewell and Houker - not with Oxford school of his own day. Stone expresses gratitude for McIlvaine's sympathy on death of his wife, and explains that he turned down a call at Trinity, Cleveland because he feels "it would not be prudent" for him to "undertake the charge of a parish" at this moment.

Date

4-26-1869

Keywords

letter, Stone, McIlvaine, church

Transcript

Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y.

April 26 1869

Right Rev. + dear Sir,

I am anxious to express my sincere thanks for your letter of the 9th. It has relieved my mind of a burden which I feared might be a heavy one hereafter,-- the thought, namely, that you perhaps remembered me only with painful feelings. But now you have assured me of your kind & affectionate regard. I trust you will always believe that, in my correspondence of a year ago, I honestly thought my theological opinions to be identical with those of Ridley + Grammer, of Jewel + of Hooker, not with those of the Oxford School of our own day.

Thank you for your kind expression of sympathy for the loss of my wife. It has been indeed a heavy stroke. I am thankful that I can believe that it was sent with a gracious design, + humbly pray that I may not, through blindness or hardness of heart, fail to apprehend its meaning. In one sense, my treasure is now laid up, where neither sickness nor decay shall corrupt; -- + where my treasure is, there my heart will be also.

I have lately received + declined an informal call to Trinity Church, Cleveland. I mention this because I head the fact might become known in Ohio, that a wrong interpretation might be put upon my non-acceptance. I declined because I do not think it prudent at present for me to undertake the charge of a parish. After the close of the present academic year, I shall probably spend a [?] while in travel or in quiet study.

This brief note, of course, requires no answer.

Believe me most sincerely,

Your obedient servant,

James Kent Stone.

The Rt. Rev.

C. P. M Ilvaine, D.D., D.O.L.

Letter from James Kent Stone to Charles P. McIlvaine

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